Thailand

Thailand’s declining epidemic is the result of successful HIV prevention programmes. A study has shown that nearly 10 million people avoided HIV transmission because of early intervention programmes with key affected populations between 1990 and 2010.4 Between 2005 and 2016, AIDS-related deaths declined by almost two thirds.
Thailand’s declining epidemic is the result of successful HIV prevention programmes. A study has shown that nearly 10 million people avoided HIV transmission because of early intervention programmes with key affected populations between 1990 and 2010.4 Between 2005 and 2016, AIDS-related deaths declined by almost two thirds.
Thailand has one of the largest HIV prevalences in Asia and the Pacific, accounting for 9% of the region’s total HIV population.
• Although the epidemic is in decline, prevalence remain high among key affected groups. • Thailand is the first country to effectively eliminate mother to child transmissions, with a transmission rate of less than 2%. • Thailand hopes to be one of the first countries to end aids by 2030, however to achieve this more must be done to target young people and key affected populations.
Explore this page to read more about populations most affected by HIV in Thailand, HIV testing and counselling programmes, HIV prevention programmes, antiretroviral treatment availability, barriers to prevention and the way forward for Thailand.
Of Thailand’s population of more than 60 million, in 2016 it was estimated that 450,000 people were living with HIV and that 6,400 people died of AIDS-related illnesses.1 After sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and the Pacific is the region with the largest number of people living with HIV, with Thailand accounting for approximately 9%.2.

Nearly 10 million people avoided HIV transmission because of early intervention programmes with key affected populations between 1990 and 2010.

Although the HIV epidemic is declining, certain groups have much higher rates of HIV compared to the general population. Those most affected are men who have sex with men, male and female sex workers, transgender people and people who inject drugs. Spouses of these populations and people living with HIV, migrant workers and prisoners are also more vulnerable to HIV than others.3 Thailand’s declining epidemic is the result of successful HIV prevention programmes. A study has shown that nearly 10 million people avoided HIV transmission because of early intervention programmes with key affected populations between 1990 and 2010.4Between 2005 and 2016, AIDS-related deaths declined by almost two thirds.5 There were 6,400 new HIV infections in Thailand in 2016.6 Most will have occurred through unprotected sex, which is estimated to account for 90% of all new HIV infections. Unsafe injecting drug use is the second biggest transmission route.7 Increased access to prevention services has resulted in new infections decreasing among some groups, however they are rising among others. For example, while the rate of new infections through injecting drug use steadily decreased between 1995 and 2015, the rate of new infections through male-to-male sex dramatically increased over the same period.

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